Problems Arising with Parenting Plans

As you discuss custody information regarding your children with our firm, parenting plans might come up. These types of plans are orders that the family court makes regarding terms about how to raise your children. They may be broad or narrow, depending on the order. 


Parenting Plans Might Not Work

Your attorney at Smith Strong can explain why these plans may not work. One reason is because it is difficult to anticipate every potential issue that may arise during your children's childhood. Because parents' schedules and children's activities change, it can be difficult to comply with the parenting plan. 


Parenting Plans are Not Enforceable

Many parenting plans are not enforceable because they are often not feasible. Police cannot be called every time that a child returns home a few minutes late. Courts cannot really make parents respect one another. Parents may not comply with the parenting plan because they have not gotten over the emotional turmoil of divorce. These parents may be angry and may express their anger inappropriately by scoffing at the concept of shared parenting. Additionally, parents may have trouble transitioning from a married partner to a single parent. Due to frustration at their changed role, the parent may express anger and non-compliance. 


Reducing Parental Anger through Parenting Plans

Separating the children from the dissolution of the marriage is imperative to having a successful parenting plan. A parenting plan can provide a basic foundation for how co-parenting will occur. However, a successful execution of this plan depends on the parents' ability to separate their anger at their ex-spouse from the children. The plan should ideally be reasonable and established in the best interests of the child. Special considerations may need to be made when dealing with particularly young children, such as not keeping the child away from his or her primary caregiver for too long of a period of time. Child development specialists may be able to provide additional advice to help center the plan around the children.